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Loucig Guloyan-Srabian

Beirut, Lebanon

Loucig Guloyan-Srabian

Project Manager

I thrive on unpredictable perspectives. Growing up in a warzone, I had the privilege to walk out of my confinement and dwell in Armenian books, where images like the sower’s fist “opening upon the fields like a dawn” fueled my imagination. Eager to find out how poets inspired an unconquered nation, I pursued a degree in English Literature, only to dabble in writing, and spend a good part of my life as a translator and cultural editor at Aztag. My translation of The Crossing Place: A Journey among the Armenians was an homage to its British author for making me fully appreciate my Armenian identity. Even then, I was obsessed with cultural diversity, darting into creativity unfettered by conventions, traveling to find out how nations generate their “offline” cultures–no joke here! What makes me tingle are old towns, street art, Geghard, Venice, natural reserves, and every museum in between! 

Joining h-pem is like crossing a mountain pass to see the other perspective; unearthing antidotes to cultural doldrums; and embracing the challenge of regenerating Armenian culture through online collaboration.

Loucig Guloyan-Srabian's articles

27 article(s) found

Syunik churches and monasteries: Armenia’s majestic frontier in a nutshell

June 05, 2021

analysis

Syunik churches and monasteries: Armenia’s majestic frontier in a nutshell

Once again Armenia’s borderlands are in distress. Syunik, the fortified realm of Armenian kingdoms, princedoms and dioceses with two millennia of turbulent history, is braced for its next reckoning as a pillar of defense against foreign powers—one of the toughest since the announcement of the independence of the Republic of Mountainous Armenia in 1921. 

Incorporated into fortresses, covered with forests, or towering over massive gorges, Syunik’s breathtaking churches and monasteries have become a symbol of continuous presence in Armenia’s southernmost province; their evocative power bringing us closer to our own reality and identity as bearers of our rich heritage.

At h-pem we take a bird’s eye view of the region's age-old monastic and cultural legacy that thrived through wars, invasions, and occupations, to become a cornerstone of enlightenment and spiritual renewal in the Armenian world.

By Loucig Guloyan-Srabian

'The Armenian Genocide. Prelude and Aftermath': Deeper than any dive into America’s haunting archives

May 03, 2021

feature

'The Armenian Genocide. Prelude and Aftermath': Deeper than any dive into America’s haunting archives

It took over hundred years for the United States to acknowledge the Armenian Genocide. But the evidence was always there, covered extensively by the American press, in words and pictures. While there have been several attempts to collect the reports scattered across different newspapers, a recent sequentially arranged and meticulously indexed multi-volume compilation stands out as the weightiest. At an impromptu meeting with h-pem in Venice, Rev. Vahan Ohanian, a co-editor of the publication, gives exclusive insights into the gigantic project that goes beyond the traditional scope of presenting the Armenian Question.

By Loucig Guloyan-Srabian

We are our stories: When nothing else makes sense in Lebanon

August 12, 2020

feature

We are our stories: When nothing else makes sense in Lebanon

"Lav es?" («Լա՞ւ ես» | "Are you all right?") It’s a simple question in Armenian that requires an unequivocally simple answer: “Lav em,” («Լաւ եմ» | "I am all right") even if you have hit rock bottom. Following the catastrophic explosion that tore apart the Beirut port and its surrounding areas, I received dozens of messages and e-mails with anxious inquiries. One particular “Lav es?” in the subject line touched me to the core, triggering a mix of thoughts and feelings, making it hard to respond right away. The words carried me back and forth and I realized I was writing a story instead.

By Loucig Guloyan-Srabian

C-rouge taps into Armenian folk treasures to make epic music

May 04, 2020

interview

C-rouge taps into Armenian folk treasures to make epic music

C-rouge was one of the first musicians who ventured into the unchartered territory of integrating electronic sounds with Armenian traditional melodies in the early 2000s. Over the years, he has traversed his way through trance and house music, aiming high for a wide range of epic orchestral scales. In this exclusive interview with h-pem, he reveals how, deep in his heart, he has always longed for a special “something” that would make a difference for the music he grew up with and adored. 

By Loucig Guloyan-Srabian

Reckoning quarter tones and beating the odds: Barkev Taslakian reaches polyphonic peaks

December 23, 2019

interview

Reckoning quarter tones and beating the odds: Barkev Taslakian reaches polyphonic peaks

Looking up to his “great teacher” Komitas, Maestro Barkev Taslakian relishes in breaking the mold and making history. His Fayha Choir is all about presenting unprecedented a capella renditions of Arabic songs, which have resonated with and captured the hearts of international audiences. Taslakian takes this vision even further to topple negative stereotypes and to promote unity and cultural diversity in an ever-divided world...

By Loucig Guloyan-Srabian

Between the ephemeral and the eternal: Levon Eskenian’s  de/re-construction of Gurdjieff and Komitas

September 25, 2019

interview

Between the ephemeral and the eternal: Levon Eskenian’s de/re-construction of Gurdjieff and Komitas

You do not see him on stage, yet Levon Eskenian has been taking his world-class Gurdjieff Ensemble to major festivals and music venues around the world, rendering ethnographically authentic music on traditional Eastern folk instruments and evoking the deep stirrings of ancient rituals. While invitations continue to pour in, we meet the man behind this unprecedented musical excavation, which has opened a new page in classical music.

By Loucig Guloyan-Srabian

Garabala: ‘Our interaction with other cultures shouldn’t be seen as a threat to our identity’

June 20, 2019

interview

Garabala: ‘Our interaction with other cultures shouldn’t be seen as a threat to our identity’

Garabala has increasingly become part and parcel of musical life in Beirut—a cherished phenomenon that brings the thrill of experimental concerts to the party spirit of modern-day kefs. After a captivating performance at this year’s installment of Innovate Armenia in LA, we met some of the band members before they hit the stage for a hometown concert.

By Loucig Guloyan-Srabian

Zulal: The floating triangle

September 08, 2018

interview

Zulal: The floating triangle

From performances at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival and the MET’s upcoming exhibition on Armenia, to concerts in churches, museums, and universities, it seems as though the Zulal a cappella trio is really after only one thing: to immortalize the essence of Armenian folk songs. But they are not mere archivists or preservationists. On the contrary, their joy in breathing new life into ancient tunes and narratives, the sweet nuances of their voices, the graceful choreography of their movements, all come together to reveal a cornucopia of songs that defy age and language. They feed the soul with intricate rhythms celebrating love and our relationship with nature, evoking an appreciation for the beauty of a simpler and slower life. How do they do this? My in-depth interview with the trio, conducted on the morning of their last concert in Beirut, reveals the secrets behind their meticulously refined performances and the wealth of their shared perspectives.

By Loucig Guloyan-Srabian

Vahé Berberian: 'You need to have some kind of a mirror'

May 15, 2018

interview

Vahé Berberian: 'You need to have some kind of a mirror'

He is a seasoned stand-up comedian who makes awkward confessions and tells hilarious real-life anecdotes in a daring effort to break taboos. He is best known for his use of local words and flavors of the Armenian language to help us laugh at ourselves, yet he's a versatile artist who paints and writes with equal passion. Even at his most serious moment, when reflecting on everything from the creative process to why it matters to be Armenian, Vahé Berberian never fails to strike an ironic chord. We meet him twice in his birthplace Beirut, between his shows and lectures, in an attempt to connect with the wizard of art and humor behind the celebrity.

By Loucig Guloyan-Srabian

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